Jun. 11th, 2017

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ultrafacts:

According to the CDC, in 10 percent of those drownings, the adult will actually watch the child do it, having no idea it is happening. Drowning does not look like drowning—Dr. Pia, in an article in the Coast Guard’s On Scene magazine, described the Instinctive Drowning Response like this:

“Except in rare circumstances, drowning people are physiologically unable to call out for help. The respiratory system was designed for breathing. Speech is the secondary or overlaid function. Breathing must be fulfilled before speech occurs.

Drowning people’s mouths alternately sink below and reappear above the surface of the water. The mouths of drowning people are not above the surface of the water long enough for them to exhale, inhale, and call out for help. When the drowning people’s mouths are above the surface, they exhale and inhale quickly as their mouths start to sink below the surface of the water.

Drowning people cannot wave for help. Nature instinctively forces them to extend their arms laterally and press down on the water’s surface. Pressing down on the surface of the water permits drowning people to leverage their bodies so they can lift their mouths out of the water to breathe.

Throughout the Instinctive Drowning Response, drowning people cannot voluntarily control their arm movements. Physiologically, drowning people who are struggling on the surface of the water cannot stop drowning and perform voluntary movements such as waving for help, moving toward a rescuer, or reaching out for a piece of rescue equipment.

From beginning to end of the Instinctive Drowning Response people’s bodies remain upright in the water, with no evidence of a supporting kick. Unless rescued by a trained lifeguard, these drowning people can only struggle on the surface of the water from 20 to 60 seconds before submersion occurs.”

This doesn’t mean that a person that is yelling for help and thrashing isn’t in real trouble—they are experiencing aquatic distress. Not always present before the Instinctive Drowning Response, aquatic distress doesn’t last long—but unlike true drowning, these victims can still assist in their own rescue. They can grab lifelines, throw rings, etc.

Look for these other signs of drowning when persons are in the water:

Head low in the water, mouth at water level

Head tilted back with mouth open

Eyes glassy and empty, unable to focus

Eyes closed

Hair over forehead or eyes

Not using legs—vertical

Hyperventilating or gasping

Trying to swim in a particular direction but not making headway

Trying to roll over on the back

Appear to be climbing an invisible ladder

So if a crew member falls overboard and everything looks OK—don’t be too sure. Sometimes the most common indication that someone is drowning is that they don’t look like they’re drowning. They may just look like they are treading water and looking up at the deck. One way to be sure? Ask them, “Are you all right?” If they can answer at all—they probably are. If they return a blank stare, you may have less than 30 seconds to get to them. And parents—children playing in the water make noise. When they get quiet, you get to them and find out why.

Source/article: [x]

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This is terrifying, please reblog. Could save a life.
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“It’s my favorite scene in the movie and it’s the most important scene in the movie. It’s also the scene that made the least sense to other people going in, which is why it’s a wonderful victory for me. I think that in superhero movies, they fight other people, they fight villains. So when I started to really hunker in on the significance of No Man’s Land, there were a couple people who were deeply confused, wondering, like, ‘Well, what is she going to do? How many bullets can she fight?’ And I kept saying, ‘It’s not about that. This is a different scene than that. This is a scene about her becoming Wonder Woman.’” -Patty Jenkins on the No Man’s Land scene
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via http://ift.tt/2rPRqJw:Wonder Woman actor Eugene Brave Rock honoured by Blood Tribe with headdress:

allthecanadianpolitics:

The Blood Tribe in southern Alberta has honoured the success of one of its members, Eugene Brave Rock.

A ceremony held at the Tatsikiisaapo'p Middle School on Thursday saw the 39-year-old actor bestowed with a headdress — the highest honour given in First Nations culture.

“Not just anybody can get a headdress,” said his aunt, Ramona Bighead, who attended the ceremony.

“Only the most notable people get one. We felt that Eugene deserved that honour.”

Brave Rock is making waves in entertainment circles for his recent role as “Chief” in Wonder Woman, the DC Comics superhero film distributed by Warner Bros.

Blood Tribe actor from Alberta speaks Blackfoot language in Wonder Woman movie

REVIEW: This is the Wonder Woman we have waited for

Born and raised on the Blood reserve, Brave Rock was highly influenced by his Blackfoot culture.

Bighead believes her nephew has displayed leadership to the community while earning the headdress honour.

“For him being an actor, in my opinion, he’s probably going to portray an Indigenous person on screen again,” she said.

“Now he has the full right to wear a headdress. No one can ever say, ‘Hey, you have no right to wear this.’”

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